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English

"In studying English, pupils develop skills in speaking, listening, reading and writing that they will need to..."
"In studying English, pupils develop skills in speaking, listening, reading and writing that they will need to..."

English is vital for communicating with others in school and in the wider world, and is fundamental to learning in all curriculum subjects.

In studying English, pupils develop skills in speaking, listening, reading and writing that they will need to participate in society and employment. Pupils learn to express themselves creatively and imaginatively and to communicate with others confidently and effectively.

Literature in English is rich and influential. It reflects the experiences of people from many countries and times and contributes to our sense of cultural identity. Pupils learn to become enthusiastic and critical readers of stories, poetry and drama as well as non-fiction and media texts, gaining access to the pleasure and world of knowledge that reading offers."

Looking at the patterns, structures, origins and conventions of English helps pupils understand how language works. Using this understanding, pupils can choose and adapt what they say and write in different situations, as well as appreciate and interpret the choices made by other writers and speakers.

The following lists provide a general overview of the topics the pupils will cover during the academic year. They will undertake various additional tasks and activities that are all designed to enhance and support the pupils learning.

  • YEAR 7 TO 9 ENGLISH
    • Hours per week: 4
    • Subject: English
    • Subject Code: 7En / 8En / 9En
    • Course description

    Course description

    This course follows the English National Curriculum and the objectives from the framework for teaching English. It is an interrelated curriculum that covers the attainment targets of Speaking and Listening, Reading and Writing. Students explore a variety of texts and media which they use as models for their own work.

    “English is vital for communicating with others in school and in the wider world, and is fundamental to learning in all curriculum subjects. In studying English, pupils develop skills in speaking, listening, reading and writing that they will need to participate in society and employment. Pupils learn to express themselves creatively and imaginatively and to communicate with others confidently and effectively.

    Literature in English is rich and influential. It reflects the experiences of people from many countries and times and contributes to our sense of cultural identity. Pupils learn to become enthusiastic and critical readers of stories, poetry and drama as well as non-fiction and media texts, gaining access to the pleasure and world of knowledge that reading offers.

    Looking at the patterns, structures, origins and conventions of English helps pupils understand how language works. Using this understanding, pupils can choose and adapt what they say and write in different situations, as well as appreciate and interpret the choices made by other writers and speakers.” English National Curriculum

    The following lists provide a general overview of the topics the pupils will cover during the academic year. They will undertake various additional tasks and activities that are all designed to enhance and support the pupils learning.


     Year 7 Units

    • 21st Century Schools Persuasive 
    • Poetry
    • Study Novel
    • Moving Image Analysis Unit
    • Shakespeare   

    Year 8 Units 

    • Crime and mystery writing
    • Shakespeare and literary heritage - Macbeth
    • Dragons Den
    • Study novel
    • 20 century Play ‘Private Peaceful’ & context work 

     Year 9 Units

    • Poetry from different cultures
    • Gothic horror
    • Study novel
    • Non-Fiction magazine unit
    • The Tempest

    Assessment 

    Students will produce one assessed piece of work per unit; either for reading or writing. They will receive a level, complete with positive comments, as well as targets and suggestions to help them progress. Students are expected to do their best to follow up on their targets in order to help them make progress.


    All Reading Tasks will be assessed for:

    • AF2: understand, describe, select or retrieve information, events or ideas from texts and use quotations and reference to text.
    • AF3: deduce, infer or interpret information, events or idea from text.
    • AF5: explain and comment on writer’s use of language, including grammatical and literary features at word and sentence level.

    All Writing Tasks will be assessed for:

    • AF1: write imaginative, interesting and thoughtful texts.
    • AF2: produce texts which are appropriate to task, reader and purpose.
    • AF5: vary sentences for clarity, purpose and effect.

    Guidelines for assessment are one lesson of planning followed by one lesson to write unless stated otherwise. 


     

  • YEAR 10 AND 11 - ENGLISH LANGUAGE


    Course Content

    The International GCSE English Language Anthology forms the basis of this course. It features a variety of texts from different writers, time periods and cultures. Both coursework pieces and the final examination will focus on the anthology.


    Year 10 

    • Analysis of Non-fiction Section A of the Anthology 
    • Original writing - Coursework 
    • Speaking and Listening – Individual class presentation 
    • Coursework - Reading assignment based on Section B of the Anthology
    • Speaking and Listening – Paired debate   

    Year 11 

    • Tackling unseen texts – Section B exam practice
    • Speaking and Listening – Group performance
    • Coursework - Original writing
    • Recap - Anthology Section A analysis (Essay Technique)
    • Exam texts and practice papers   

    Final Assessment 

    Examination (70%)

    Section A: A series of questions based on an unseen Non-fiction text. 

    Section B: Two Compulsory tasks based on Anthology Section A.
    • Analytical essay based on a given text
    • Piece of original writing based on the theme/ issue raised in the text.
    Section C: Written piece. Not linked to the Anthology.

    Reading and Writing Coursework (20%)

     Two tasks 

    • Writing: Throughout the course there will be several opportunities to produce writing based on the triplets (Explore, imagine, entertain or argue, persuade, advise.). However, only one piece will be chosen as the student’s coursework entry.
    • Reading: An analytical comparison of two chosen pieces from Section B of the Anthology.

    Speaking and Listening Coursework (10%)

     Three tasks

    • 1 individual: Describe, narrate
    • 1 group: Argue/ discuss/ role play.
    • 1 paired: Persuade/discuss/text discussion. 
  • YEAR 10 AND 11 - ENGLISH LITERATURE


    Course Content 

    The study of one key Shakespeare Play and one classic Novel form the basis for the International GCSE English Literature course. It also features a Poetry unit based upon poetry from Section C of the course anthology.


    Year 10

    • Play; Shakespeare – Romeo and Juliet or J.B. Priestley 'An Inspector Calls' (exam text)
    • Coursework – Comparing Poetry from the Anthology 

    Year 11

    • Novel study – Of Mice and men (John Steinbeck)
    • Essay practice – exam technique

    Final Assessment

    Examination (60%)
    Section A: Pupils choose one essay title from a possible two on Romeo and Juliet or An Inspector Calls
    Section B: Pupils choose one essay title from a possible two on Of Mice and Men

    Coursework (40%)

      One task:
    • Poetry assignment based on 6 poems. 3 from Section C of the Anthology, and 3 others that have been covered in class.

     

  • YEAR 12 AND 13 - ENGLISH LITERATURE
    • Qualification: Cambridge International AS Level Language and Literature in English
    • Examination Board: CIE
    • Syllabus/ Specification: 9695
    • Subject Code: 12En
    • Hours per week: 6 hours

    Course Content 

    Cambridge International AS Level Literature in English requires candidates to answer two compulsory papers: Paper 3 Poetry and Prose, and Paper 4 Drama. Overall, at AS Level candidates are required to study four set texts. In each paper candidates answer two questions, each on a different text. Candidates are required to answer questions on a range of poems, prose and plays, with options from the canon of English Literature and modern texts in English. Close study of all the texts chosen is needed in preparation for a choice of essay and passage-based questions. 


    AS

    Paper 3 Poetry and Prose

    • Candidates answer two questions: one question from Section A Poetry and one question from Section B Prose. 
    • The paper is worth 50 marks
    • The examination is 2 hours long
    • The paper has a 50% weighting
    • It is a closed book examination
    • The text to be studied are:

      • The House of Mirth by Edith Wharton
      • Ted Hughes Selected Poems
    • An essay question and a passage- based question are set on each text.
    • In all answers, candidates must show understanding of the text and an informed independent opinion; they must communicate these clearly and appropriately.
    • They must explore:

      • The ways in which writers’ choices of form, structure and language shape meanings
      • The language and style of texts
      • The effective use of narrative methods
      • How parts of the text relate to the work as a whole

    Paper 4 Drama

    • Candidates answer two questions on two plays.
    • The paper is worth 50 marks
    • The examination is 2 hours long
    • The paper has a 50% weighting
    • It is a closed book examination
    • The text to be studied are:

      • A Man for All Seasons by Robert Bolt
      • A Midsummer Night’s Dream by William Shakespeare
    • An essay question and a passage- based question are set on each text.

    A Level

    Unit 3 – Texts and Genres is worth 30% of the final A level grade.  It is assessed by a two hour written paper during which students cannot refer to copies of the texts.  Students will study three texts including at least one text written between 1300-1800.   Candidates choose one topic area for study: Elements of the Gothic, or Elements of the Pastoral. The texts studied will be decided by students and teachers during the AS year.

    Unit 4 - Further and Independent Reading is worth 20% of the final A level grade.  It is assessed by two pieces of written coursework; a comparative study of an aspect of two texts and the application of critical ideas from a pre-released critical anthology to a literary text of the students own choice

"In studying English, pupils develop skills in speaking, listening, reading and writing that they will need to..."